Sweating the small stuff

Yesterday I was catching up with a good friend from home (who shall remain nameless but is hopefully in labor!) and telling her that my boss had approved me working part-time for a few months to allow me to transition back from maternity leave.   She asked how that would impact the nanny (it won’t, we’re still keeping her regular hours and I’ll just send her home early most days) and whether or not we’ve asked her to clean or help around the house.  I was explaining that  I wanted to keep our housekeeper, so for now we’ve only asked the nanny to  help with baby stuff – bottles, her laundry, and straightening up toys and books.  I realized, to a non foreign service person, I sounded maybe a bit spoiled.

If only she knew where my night went after our chat.

JR and I went to dinner at one of our favorite places that just reopened, Pacific Rim.  We ordered a large bottled water, and the server brought out glasses with ice and poured them before we could say anything.  Now, normally I wouldn’t really think much of this, but as I was catching up on missed e-mails yesterday, I read an updated notice about the water in Pristina – reiterating that the tap water is not safe to drink.  And I think it’s safe to presume that the ice was made with tap water.  I wound up not drinking any of it, and JR just poured his water into a glass without ice.  I told him that the revised guidelines recommended bleaching raw fruits and vegetables, to protect from contamination.  Bleaching produce is not uncommon for FS folks living overseas, but I’ve certainly never had to do it.

While we were at dinner, he mentioned that his office offered him the chance to do a TDY (short-term work in another location) out of the country next week.  He was willing to pass it up, but it’s important that he has these opportunies for professional development and growth.  I told him he should absolutely go, and I would make do.  But I didn’t say it without reservations.  In my head I was remembering how difficult it was when he was in DC for two weeks, and that was while I was not working and had tons of family help around.   As it is, he is tentatively scheduled to make two  2-week trips back to DC in the near future without us. I know many, many people face separations from their spouses and families, but I hate it.  Sometimes I want to yell “I didn’t sign up for this!”  Except we did.

After dinner, we made our way home and started the bedtime and bath routine with Abby.  Our main bathroom (we have a second toilet in the laundry room) was again covered in ants.  Right beside the toilet and the bathtub.  I was so annoyed and disgusted.  Now, if I lived in Ohio, I would have immediately gone to Kroger or Walmart to buy Raid and ant traps.  Alas, not an option here.  In fact, I’m not certain where they would sell ant killer, and I also have doubts about my ability to purchase that on my own.   I’m afraid I’d buy something not safe for use indoors, and that’s not a risk I want to take with the baby and our cat in the house.  JR helped me hose down the bathroom (literally, we used our detachable shower head and sprayed all the ants down and into the drain on the floor) and we called it a night.

This morning, I had to visit no less than 3 different rooms in our house just to try to straighten my hair.  Some of our electronics can be plugged directly into the wall with the help of a small plastic adapter, making the prongs fit.  Other items must be plugged into a transformer, which is a heavy, unweildy box that sits on the ground.   Our house came with 4 transformers.  Those have served us reasonably well so far.  We use one in our living room for our TV, computer, and other electronics.  One in the kitchen for our toaster, blender, and other kitchn applicances.  There’s also the one in our bedroom which I use for my blow dryer and straightner.  We never really used the 4th one, although we moved it into the baby’s nursery assuming it would come in handy.

Well, it would come in handy if it worked.  The US plugs don’t stay in, they fall out or hang there precariously, causing whatever is plugged in to shut on and off constantly.  It seemed unsafe (not to mention incredibly annoying) so we moved that transformer out of Abby’s room and swapped it with the one in our bedroom.   Let me tell you how frustrating it is to try to do your hair when the applicance turns off every 5-10 seconds.  Eventually, I gave up and went to the kitchen to get that transformer, carried it to the bathroom, and used it there (ants and all).  I had to carry it back to the kitchen so I could use my toaster, which I can’t even keep on the counter anymore, because we now have a drying rack and bottles taking up valuable real estate in the kitchen.  If JR and I were picking our own apartment, this kitchen would not make the cut.

My one wall, 3 small countertops kitchen.

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Don’t get me started on trying to cook and prepare food with the limited space, but this morning all I wanted was some %$&* toast!    Assigned housing is a part of life in the FS.  I’m sure at some posts this is considered a really great kitchen, and for others it’s definitely on the small and inconvenient side.  (It’s important to add here that housing is one of the benefits that we receive in the FS, and JR feels very strongly that we should not complain about things we receive for free.)

As with everything in life, there are good things and bad, and you have to learn to take it all in stride.  I hesitated to post this, because the majority of the time, we are happy here and thankful for all of the opportunties that JR’s job brings us.  But I figure everyone is allowed to have a grumpy day, right?

And I always have JR to send me things like this.

britney

 

The long trip home: Part 2

So where were we…

We woke up Saturday morning still tired and wondering what the day would bring.  JR went to the airport to see what we needed to do regarding our bags, and to collect our vouchers.  We hoped we’d be able to stay in the hotel again that night since our flight wasn’t until 11 pm.  It took him over two hours, and during that time he learned that although he and Abby had tickets that night, I didn’t,  that our bags were most likely in DC or Frankfurt, and United would not give us a voucher for the hotel that day.   However, they were generous enough to give us each another $7 food voucher!  Instead of checking out at 11 am and spending the day in the airport we decided to go ahead and book the hotel room for another day anyway, and just pay for it ourselves.

Luckily for us, there was a Chili’s restaurant just a two minute walk from our hotel.  We love Chili’s (we have very sophisticated palettes). After we ate, JR took the baby back to eat while I hopped in a taxi and asked to go to the nearest grocery store so I could buy more diapers.  The driver took me to Whole Foods, and I honestly wasn’t sure if they sold diapers there, but turns out they do!   When I arrived back at the hotel we all took a long nap before making our way to the airport later that night.

We went straight to baggage claim to try and determine the exact location of our luggage.   In an interesting twist, they forwarded all 5 bags to Munich because they mistakenly believed we had booked the Munich flight – even though we never did.  We went upstairs to wait in line at the Turkish counter since it opened at 7:30 pm, feeling antsy about getting seats together and hoping we might still get the bassinet row (which we had reserved for our original Frankfurt flight).  They look like this:

bassinets

We wanted Abby to have a spot to stretch out during the long flight. Unfortunately, those rows were booked but they were able to put us all together, and that was the most important part.  Our flight to Istanbul was pretty uneventful. Abby slept most of it and hardly ever cried. She didn’t seem stressed at all by our troubles up to that point.

abby plane 1 abby plane 2 abby plane 3

Abby really likes to stretch.

We landed in Istanbul on time (shocker!) and walked down the steps to collect our stroller on the tarmac, which we had checked at the gate JUST before boarding the plane in DC, alongside several other strollers. We see all of these families putting their strollers together and strapping their kids in, but our stroller is no where to be found. I asked one of the employees if they were still unloading, and tried to explain that our stroller should be with this pile, but he didn’t really understand English.  A nice lady attempted to translate for us and she gathered that our stroller was either in DC or lost, because it wasn’t on the plane.  The employee kept on saying that if we gate-checked our stroller then it would be here.  We obviously agreed with him, but that didn’t answer the question of where did it go?  How in the world did they lose a large GATE CHECKED ITEM?!  At this point I was like “WHY IS THIS HAPPENING TO MEEEEE”?

it isn't fair

JR made his way to a Turkish counter and asked about the stroller. They told him it could be in Pristina or DC, and we could wait and see when we got there, or he could exit through customs, find their Lost and Found, file a report, then come back through security and make the next flight. I told him I thought that was ridiculous and we’d deal with it at home, surely something would go our way and the stroller would be waiting for us in Pristina. The only highlight of this stop was running into our friends Shawn and Amy, returning from a weekend trip to Istanbul and on the same short flight to Pristina. It was nice to see some friendly faces and introduce them to Abby!

Although we were scheduled to land in Pristina at 7:45pm, of course we were almost an hour late. The good news was that ALL of our checked bags from our original flight were there waiting for us! The bad news was that our stroller was not. They told us to file a claim with Turkish when we got home. Sigh. Our friends were nice enough to wait for us and help us load up our bags in the van, and we were FINALLY headed home. Hooray!

You know that feeling when you think nothing else could possibly go wrong? And then you realize you were so, so very wrong. In early April we sent two shipments – a layette with baby items like a Pack n Play, swing, etc., and a consumables shipment with food, diapers and wipes. The guys who handled that packout said that the crib, mattress, and rug should go in my consumables shipment to help with packaging and it allowed me more weight/space in my layette shipment (which has a limit of 250lbs – that adds up really quickly). We were under the impression BOTH shipments would be waiting in our apartment for us. Why would we assume this?  Because they said that our shipments had arrived and were waiting for us in our apartment.  Not so fast. Only the layette was there. Okay fine, at least we have her pack n play and swing, we can survive on that for a while.

Then I realize our internet wasn’t working. Since we were away for so long, it appeared our contract with the internet company had expired. And then there was a small flood in our bathroom so there was standing water all over. So yeah, I had a major minor meltdown.  Not my finest moment but I had definitely reached my limit.

So that was Sunday and now it’s Friday. Maintenance fixed the leak first thing Monday which was great, although we then realized we had an ant problem as a result, but we’re getting that resolved too. JR had our internet fixed right away on Monday, and we’ve been in contact with the shipping company about the rest of our things.  Consumables are currently in Antwerp, Belgium and should be delivered in about 2 weeks.  And best of all, after many calls and emails with Turkish Airlines, we received our stroller yesterday!

Things could have turned out much worse and we’re thankful that we received all our lost luggage, and that we all made it here safely and together.  But – I’m going to need a lot of booze before I make a trek like that again.

will and grace

drink on plane

 

 

The long trip home

I considered a few different titles for this post, and almost named it “The time United tried to ruin my life.”  But that seemed a tad dramatic.

On Friday afternoon my mom dropped us off at the Cleveland airport.  We took a few photos of our huge pile of luggage since we so proud of our packing skills and then we were off (or so we thought).

bags

We grabbed a bite to eat in the terminal before reaching our gate and because we were seated at a bar top up against a wall, I thought it was a good opportunity to let Abby stretch her legs.  And then of course I took a picture because she is kind of passed out at a bar. For a hot minute I wanted to post on Facebook that Abby was passed out at the bar.  Mom of the year right here.

at the bar

Since we had a tight connection in DC (only 55 minutes!), JR asked the gate agent if they could have a United employee meet us in DC to help us make it to the next flight.  We had 3 carry on bags, 2 diaper bags, the stroller, car seat, base, and the oh-so-critical Boppy, which made it difficult to move quickly.   We also inquired about preboarding – we thought it would make more sense for us and for other passengers so we weren’t in their way as we tried to collapse and bag up our stroller right before getting on the plane, and while we installed our car seat and base in Abby’s seat on the plane.  Getting the car seat in a car is hard enough, but we knew with the tight space on a plane it was going to be tricky.  Apparently, United (and most other US carriers) no longer offer preboarding for families with small children.  Who knew?

The plane had some kind of issue so we were delayed leaving, and I kept glancing at my watch knowing we were losing valuable time to make our connection.  Abby was wide awake and staring out the window for most of the flight from Cleveland to DC.

abby first plane

By the time we landed and made our way off the plane, it was 9:30pm.  According to our tickets, boarding for our next flight began at 9:15 pm and closed at 9:45pm.  I quickly asked the first few United employees that I saw if there was a luggage cart waiting for us, or even one of those oversized golf carts to drive us to Terminal C, which was a very long walk and a tram ride away. I showed them the printed slip from the gate agent in Cleveland that allegedly made the request prior to our arrival.  Everyone I approached looked at me like they didn’t understand what I was talking about, and then told me “we don’t have carts here.  We don’t do that here.”  Oh.  Okay then.

JR waited for our gate checked items and we started hauling through the airport as fast as we could.  We didn’t even stop to put the stroller together, because we were in such a rush.  But it made it that much harder to move quickly because we were carrying so much stuff.  Car seat + base + baby = 26lbs in one hand.  We were still in Terminal A at 9:45pm, and as we passed a United service desk with no line, we figured we may as well make  a quick stop and ask about our options since we clearly weren’t making our flight.  The man we spoke to was unable to comprehend what we were asking (seriously, do they teach the blank stare to all employees? Is it in the handbook?!)

ice cube blank stare

When we explained a second time he looked at our tickets, at the clock, at ALL OF OUR CRAP, and told us we’d surely make our flight since it was a “2 minute walk.”  Okay then.

We rushed.  We sweated.  We cursed (at least I did.)  We walked up to our gate about ten minutes past 10pm, and even though we knew the answer we still asked if we could board our flight.  Nope.  So we took our pile ‘o stuff and walked a few more gates down to a customer service area and got in line for rebooking.  The guy there told us we may as well take a seat because it would probably take 30 minutes or longer.  And so we sat.   When he finally came over to us, he informed us that the earliest we could get out would be Sunday at 6pm on a Lufthansa flight.  No guarantees we’d be seated together (all 3 tickets were purchased separately by JR’s work, so although it’s highly unlikely it would actually happen, technically Abby could have been seated by herself) and we would most likely not have the bassinet seat we’d been banking on for the long flight.   He said United would cover our hotel and offer meal vouchers for the time we were stuck, but due to their policy, he could only offer us one night worth of vouchers.  In the morning, we would need to check out of our hotel and return to Dulles to collect vouchers for the second night, because they also couldn’t guarantee the same room or even same hotel for us.

I wish you could have seen our faces.  But there wasn’t much we could do.  We were very worried that our luggage made the connecting flight but he assured us that if we didn’t make the flight, then our bags wouldn’t be put on the plans.   He then asked if we wanted our checked baggage with us, or sent ahead to our destination.  Since we were looking at an extended delay we asked to pick up all of our bags.   After he put in that request, he gave us instructions on where to claim the bags, where we might find an open place to eat (it was probably 11:15ish at that point) and how to get to the hotel shuttle.  We made our way to baggage claim pretty slowly, because he said it would probably be an hour and a half before our bags were delivered.   The deli he referenced had some pre-made cold sandwiches for $7.99 each.  Note, our United food vouchers were for $7 per person.  So I’m assuming they meant they would cover a few vending machine purchases, because you can’ t really have a meal for $7. JR was not pleased and we are still confused as to why they’re called “meal” vouchers.

We purchased what we wanted, minus the $7 voucher from the cafe and settled in for awhile at baggage claim.  JR paid for two luggage carts so we could transport our 5 checked bags to the shuttle, and we waited.   It seemed like there were a lot of people around us having problems and the employees were coming by occasionally to provide information, but never to us.  After an hour or so, I decided to wait in the line to talk to one of the United employees working in the baggage area.  Very politely and apologetically, she said our bags were on their way to Frankfurt.  I’ll never understand how they made the flight and we didn’t, but I digress.  I asked her to check again, because just an hour earlier the man upstairs said he ordered our bags for us, and they’d be sent down here.  No amount of double checking changed the answer, the bags weren’t coming.  She did check to see if any new flight options had opened up, and due to a cancellation she offered us a chance to leave DC on Saturday at 5pm, fly to Munich, and then to Pristina.  The catch was an 8+ hour layover in Munich.  JR and I talked it over and thought that would be pretty miserable with the baby coming off an overseas flight.  I felt confident if I could get on the phone with someone I could find us a better route, so we told her no thanks and made our way to the hotel shuttle.  We left our empty luggage carts sitting there.

The wait for the shuttle was probably only 20 minutes or so, but we were so burnt out at that point.  Abby had – amazingly – been asleep since we got off the plane.  But she was finally starting to fuss, poor girl was hungry and needed changed.  Of course we are outside and I don’t want to do anything to cause us to miss this shuttle and get to our hotel even later.  I held her while JR changed her.  Thank goodness it was only a wet diaper.  We made it to the hotel around 1:30 am, got our room, fed the baby, and after a long phone call with United, I had us booked to leave Saturday at 11 pm.  It had been such a long day and we all crashed for the night around 3 am.

So that was our first day of travel.  If you are still reading this, I’m impressed.  To be continued…

SPOILER ALERT – we eventually made it to Pristina safe and sound, but cranky.

 

 

 

Party in the USA

Somehow, it’s been a month since Abby was born.  Here are a few highlights of the last 4 weeks!

– We were surprised on our second day in the hospital when a photographer came in for an impromptu photo shoot.  Abby was barely 48 hours old, so we had low expectations for the pictures.  The photographer did a really good job of soothing her and trying some different poses, but when she showed us her price brochure, we knew we weren’t interested, especially because we had a scheduled appointment with a local photographer a few weeks later.   She came back to our room a few hours later to show us a slideshow she’d created with the photos.   Next thing you know, we are all in tears (me, JR, and my sister who was visiting), and I told JR we just HAD TO HAVE the $160 package.  Even more surprising is that he agreed without another word – that should tell you what a smooth operation this lady was running (and how sleep deprived we were)!   Some of our favorites:

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And the picture that makes my heart explode:

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– Our girl would prefer to sleep the day away, so in an effort to keep her awake more, I’ve started singing to her.  It’s quite unfortunate for her because I can’t sing on key to save my life. (You would be surprised to learn that I was part of a group that won FIRST place in our junior high talent show, performing as back up singer for our good friend K.  The song was “Nobody Knows it But Me”, which over the years my family has changed to “Nobody Knows How to Sing.”  My part was tragic.)  Anyway, I wanted to sing songs to Abby and I was racking my brain, the only thing I could come up with was “If You’re Happy and You Know It.”   Drawing a complete blank on other kid songs, I started singing Kesha and Miley Cyrus to her, much to JR’s dismay.  But when I sang “Party in the USA” complete with moving her around – you know, nodding her head like yeah, moving her hips like yeah – I’m telling you the child was loving it.  It was a sweet bonding experience.

– We’ve had so many visitors the first several weeks, and it’s been fun introducing Abby to our friends and family.  It was especially nice to welcome our friends Shawn and Amanda, and their little guy Logan.  Shawn is one of our dearest friends from law school (he was the bell ringer at our wedding, a very important job!) and he always dreamed of visiting Orrville.  Abby was glad to give him a reason to finally make the trip!

shawn orrville

– JR had to leave on Sunday for two weeks of training in DC.  I’ve been solo parenting (and I use that word VERY loosely, considering my grandparents are upstairs and my mom is always nearby to help) for barely 3 days now and holy cow.  We had our biggest diaper blow out to date, I failed to properly pack my diaper bag twice, and I’m convinced the baby hates me.  Maybe things will get better? (Since writing that sentence, the diaper situation has continued to decline.  Yesterday while changing her, she managed to put her foot in her dirty diaper, and then she deliberately kicked me with said foot, and made a huge mess.  Abby 10, Jenni 0.)  We’re headed to DC for the weekend to visit JR and I can’t wait!

abby one monthabby pink outfit

 

 

My first Mother’s Day

No big deal, but last week JR and I welcomed a beautiful baby girl into the world.  Abigail Grace was born on May 3, weighing a whopping 7lbs, 3oz.  She’s healthy and happy, and we’re having a great time figuring out this parenting business.

abby hospital

Last year on this day, JR and I had just packed out of our apartment and we were living in a hotel in DC, about to move to Kosovo.  I talked him into having brunch at our hotel that morning.  More than once, he asked me how much the brunch would be and I said I wasn’t sure of the price, but probably around $40.  They were offering bottomless mimosas and I couldn’t resist.  We were having a fantastic meal and taking them up on that mimosa deal.  Justin remarked “you know, this will probably be the last Mother’s Day that you aren’t a mom.”  Tears welled up in my eyes and I told him that was a really sweet thought.   It was a perfect meal and we were having a great time…until the bill came.  It was $79 BEFORE tip and JR’s reaction looked like this:

jim carrey gag

Oops.

Anyway, fast forward one year and here we are!  I woke up this morning to some sweet baby snuggles, a card from JR that made me cry (but what doesn’t these days?), and then went out to lunch with the other moms in my family.  It still feels a bit strange to refer to myself as a mom, but we are having a lot of fun together so far.  Well, I’m having fun and I’m choosing to believe she thinks I’m great!

Happy Mother’s Day to my mom, my mother in law, my grandmothers, aunts and dear friends and moms-to-be!

abby car seat

(Note – the car seat picture was taken before the nurse came in to show us how to properly tighten the straps.  She just looks so cute and tiny in there!)

abby 1

abby mother's day

Mardi Gras, TLD, and a surprise shower!

This past weekend was our last weekend together before JR heads off to training for work and I go back to Ohio for maternity leave. Mostly I appreciate that time is moving forward, but I’m not excited about being apart for so long, so I wanted to really enjoy our time together.

Friday night, the marines hosted a Mardi Gras party complete with gumbo, jambalaya, king cake and beads.   JR was in charge of the jambalaya and made a triple batch – an impressive feat considering the size of our kitchen.   It receieved rave reviews and the pots were emptied pretty quickly. Guests were encouraged to wear purple and gold, but I’m currently rotating about 4 different shirts that fit over my stomach, and they are not in those colors. Luckily no one seemed to mind.

Saturday was a very special Terrific Lady Day.   We started using this term after watching an episode of The League, when one of the characters tells his friends that he’s giving his wife a Terrific Lady Day where they do whatever she wants.  It’s a rare treat but I love TLD.

This is how I felt when I woke up early Saturday morning:

excited-baby

I laid out my vision for the day – first we’d go grocery shopping, and then come home and clean. JR was not impressed, but those things make me happy! He suggested that I schedule a massage appointment, and I was able to talk him into a couples’ massage. Halfway through TLD, I assume JR was thinking “never again.” We finished up the day with a delicious dinner and watching Dallas Buyer’s Club (highly, highly recommend that movie! I adore Matthew Mc-however you spell it, and teared up a bit during his Oscar acceptance speech. Also, you should watch True Detective on HBO.)

Sunday morning, Amy picked me up for a brunch at Jessica’s. Breakfast foods and brunching are very high on the list of things I miss about living at home, so when Jessica sent out an invitation for a brunch, I replied within seconds! Turns out, my very sweet, and very sneaky friends had planned a surprise shower for me! We had a great spread of food – homemade cinnamon rolls, meatballs, eggs, waffles, fruit, and french toast casserole. We played a quick game to try to figure out the baby’s sex, but it was a draw. Looks like we’ll have to wait until May (which is driving my poor mother CRAZY).

I wish I would have taken more pictures, and I particularly wish I would have remembered to skinny arm and strike a better pose when standing next to Jessica. I swear, I’m not that big. It’s just the most unflattering angle I could have picked, but I wanted to post a few anyway because she did such a great job of putting this together.

photo (3)

photo (4)

I’m not really ready to talk about it yet, but some of the great friends we’ve made in Kosovo won’t be here when we get back. That’s the norm for life in the foreign service, but it’s still new to me and I’m definitely not ready to say goodbye to these wonderful people who have helped make Kosovo our home for the past year.

Med-what?

The first time I heard the term medevac (medical evacuation) we were having brunch with one of JR’s friends (R) who was, at the time, stationed in the newest country in the world, South Sudan. JR was still in the hiring process, and I was playing 20 million questions with her about the job, the lifestyle, and everything in between. R had some personal experience with medevac and was explaining some of the details to us. Essentially, if the medical officer at post determines that your illness/injury/whatever requires a level of care that is not accessible locally, you will be medically evacuated to your post’s designated medevac site. For many countries in this region, that’s London.

In my head I was picturing helicopters, flashing lights, emergency personnel and a rush to get the patient out of the country as quickly as possible. While I’m sure in some unfortunate instances it may happen like that, a medevac can also be an event that is planned for months in advance, such as when a woman returns to the US to have a baby.

It’s the general recommendation that FSOs and their EFMs give birth in the U.S. I believe if I were adamant about remaining here they would not force me to leave. However, JR and I are both comfortable following the recommendations of State and the doctors here, and they advise that I return to the U.S. by 34 weeks. So from the time we confirmed my pregnancy and due date, I had an expected departure date. I can choose to leave post earlier, and if I have any medical complications or there are concerns, post can decide to send me earlier.

I have the option of returning to anywhere in the U.S. to deliver. I will be there for about six weeks before the baby is born, and will remain there until the baby is six weeks old, at which point the baby will obtain his/her own medical clearance and passport, be offically added to JR’s travel orders, and we will return to Kosovo (if that sounds simple, let me assure you – it won’t be. The to-do list looks very complicated and we’ve heard it can be very time consuming and difficult to get this all processed within six weeks.) There was really no question that I would be going to Ohio. Now, if I were the FSO, I might opt to deliver in DC, because then I’d have the possibility of working up until the baby’s birth.

While you are on medevac, you are entitled to a per diem allowance for housing and food and miscellaneous expenses. Depending on the anticipated length of your medevac, you can choose to stay in a hotel or a short term rental, but the rate must meet the per diem amount or you will be responsible for the difference. If you have the option of staying with family and wish to do so, then you do not receive any housing allowance, but you do receive the food/miscellaneous portion of the per diem. Luckily for us, my grandparents have a basement apartment that is just waiting for me to move in (I’ve already started to refer to them as my roomies). You can look up any city’s per diem rates here: http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/104877?utm_source=OGP&utm_medium=print-radio&utm_term=perdiem&utm_campaign=shortcuts

Additionally, my flight home and return flight are covered by the medevac, although techinically when I fly back with the baby, the baby will fly on JR’s travel orders, not on my medevac orders.  The baby will have his or her own plane ticket, which is nice so that I can bring an infant seat on the plane, but seems like it would be much more useful if they wanted to pay for my mom to have a plane ticket to fly back with me.  🙂  But before we can do that, we’ll go through the 30 step process of getting the baby cleared and permitted to travel. JR’s travel to join me for the baby’s birth is not paid for, so we will probably use his R&R ticket to cover that expense. We are still working out the details of his leave -how much time can he take, when should he fly back, and things like that.

Phew.  That is a LOT of information and probably more than anyone actually cares to know about this process.

bored